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Verona Tourism: Best of Verona

Are you planning your vacation in Verona, Italy? Are you looking for all the information on Verona? On Visititaly Varese you find tourist guides written by the editorial staff and travel experiences of travellers who, like you, have chosen Verona as a destination for a trip or for their holidays. Discover Verona Top travel tips with Visititaly's suggestions, recommendations, travel advice and all things to know about Verona.

HOTEL EDEN - Brenzone (35 Km from Verona)
The Hotel Eden*** belongs to the Family Consolini since ever and it has been continually renovated during the time, to be always a nice and welcoming hotel loved by its numerous regular guests, who are used to spend here their holidays. The Hotel is ...
The town of Verona has an elevation of 59 m (194 ft) is located in the county of Verona (VR). The Patron saint is Saint Zeno of Verona on April 12. The town is divided in parishes: Avesa, San Michele Extra, San Massimo all'Adige, Quinzano, Quinto di Valpantena, Poiano di Valpantena, Parona di Valpolicella, Montorio Veronese, Mizzole, Marchesino, Chievo, Cà di David e Moruri. Residents of Verona has the demonym of "Veronesi or Scaligeri".

In Verona there are 600 accomodation. You may visit 69 places of interest. Verona is part of a route called Strada del Vino Valpolicella, so it's particularly recommended for a food and wine holiday.
Guide written by the community written by Alexandra Evans

Verona is very well connected by road, rail and has an international airport. In order to get to the city, there are three different options one can choose from;1. By car: Getting to Verona through the use of a car is quite easy. Two different freeways exactly cross the city. The Austrada (A22- Brennero –Modena) goes from north to south while another freeway, A4 Milan –Venice, goes from east to west. While on the... continue


BELFIORE PARK HOTEL - Brenzone (35 Km from Verona)
The new Belfiore Park Hotel, completely renovated and upgraded, is situated in Brenzone sul Garda, direct on the beach, in one of the most beautiful position of the lake. All rooms and Suites are modern, with various styles, different details and balcony ...
Guide written by the community written by Alexandra Evans

Once you have had enough of a first day whilst in Verona, save enough energy to have the better of the city in the second day. Complete your second day in Verona by ensuring to visit the following places:  1. The Verona Arena. It dates back to the 1st century and is an ancient Roman amphitheater. The structure contributes to the world’s heritage status. Visit the Arena and step back in time in this majestic... continue


Guide written by the community written by Alexandra Evans

The historic city of Verona came to birth in the 1st century B.C. The city flourished under the rule of the Scaliger family in the 14th and 13th centuries and was part of the Republic of Venice from the 15th to the 18th century. It is undoubtedly one of Italy’s beautiful cities and is also known as "little Rome". The city stands on the River Adinger in Veneto, north of Italy. Verona is a main tourist... continue


Guide written by the community written by Chiara Guzzetti

The gate was built during the Roman Republic by P. Valerius, Q. Caecilius, Q. Servilius and P. Cornelius, and restructured in imperial times. It was connected to the road which led to Bologna and Aquileia. The original Roman name is unknown. During the Middle Ages it was called Porta San Fermo, due to the nearby church, while in the Renaissance it was known as Arco di Valerio. The current name derives from a Roman... continue


Guide written by the community written by Andrew adams

The Castelvecchio dates back to the 14th century and it was built for the Scaligeri family, who ruled over Verona during the Middle Ages. In reality, the castle was more like a medieval fortress built to protect the family from their enemies in Venice and also from popular uprisings, complete with a moat (it's now dry), a drawbridge, and a fortified bridge at the back that would allow the Scaligeri to escape in case... continue


Guide written by the community written by Chiara Guzzetti

The door belongs to the long stretch of the southwest of the city's defensive wall and, despite the changes made by the Austrians, preserves much of its original shape. It was conceived as a large block inserted in the walls, accessible through a drawbridge that covered a gap, thus functioning as a portal of entry to the walls. As the plants from the traditional model, a square, with the middle lane wider, but much... continue


Guide written by the community written by Chiara Guzzetti

Porta Vescovo was the access to the east of Verona. The name probably derives from the fact that the Bishop of Verona had some rights over duties for goods entering through this passage. The present monument was done in Venice at the time, when the door was enlarged and equipped with the beautiful facade decorated with white stone. The structure is that of the triumphal arch, picked up by many Roman models in the... continue


Guide written by the community written by Alexandra Evans

San Zeno is less monumental than the other doors, being conceived as a civilian port, without any defensive purpose because of its proximity to the Bastion of San Zeno. Economy and speed of execution (built and completed in one year) have preferred a design more quickly, and limited use of stone covering facades combined with large brick panels that give it a less threatening aspect than other ports. The... continue


Guide written by the community written by Chiara Guzzetti

The originality of this major port is constituted by the grand portico open to the city, recalling the ancient prestige as a classic of the Roman city that was reached following the course which started from here. The exterior facade is inspired by the model of the triumphal Roman arch; the tuff is divided into three rectangular doors, of which the central one is larger, enclosed by pairs of Doric columns. Above the... continue


Guide written by the community written by Chiara Guzzetti

This small "semi-private" museum is a tribute and a gesture of love to the world of Radio, the discovery that has contributed most to change the way to spread information and culture in our century.The equipment and models on display were chosen from the private collection of Alberto Chiantera, starting from the early telegraph transmitters and radio operators, with their massive Ruhmkorff coil, and followed... continue


Guide written by the community written by Chiara Guzzetti

The convent complex of San Francesco al Corso dates to the thirteenth century. In 1935, Antonio Avena, director of the civic museums, opened to the public the so-called “Tomb of Juliet”. This site, according to legend, is where the sarcophagus holding the bodies of Romeo and Juliet was placed, and it naturally became a tourist attraction. The annexed “G.B. Cavalcaselle” Fresco Museum, inaugurated in 1975, houses... continue


Guide written by the community written by Chiara Guzzetti

The collections displayed in the Canonicale Museum of Verona have an ancient history, tightly connected to the centuries old vicissitudes of the Chapter of the Canonicals of the Cathedral. The museum is inside the cloister of the Cathedral, an area built on the remains of early Christians basilicas of the fourth and fifth century whose mosaics floors are still visible under the cloister and St Elena's church.... continue


Guide written by the community written by Chiara Guzzetti

The Courtyard of the Mercato Vecchio is the name given to the inner courtyard of the Palazzo del Comune. The square courtyard is bounded by the four inner walls of the Palazzo, the zebra striped decorative effect, obtained by using bands of brick and stone, is common to both the exterior and interior walls. The courtyard is distinguished by the bold design of its gallery, which is built in the solid Romanesque... continue


Guide written by the community written by Chiara Guzzetti

The Castelvecchio dates back to the 14th century and it was built for the Scaligeri family, who ruled over Verona during the Middle Ages. In reality, the castle was more like a medieval fortress built to protect the family from their enemies in Venice and also from popular uprisings, complete with a moat (it's now dry), a drawbridge, and a fortified bridge at the back that would allow the Scaligeri to escape in case... continue


Guide written by the community written by Chiara Guzzetti

In the days of the Roman empire, the area where Piazza delle Erbe now stands was known as Verona's "forum": it was a popular marketplace and was of great social importance. One could say that things haven't changed all that much over the years - between the souvenir stalls that stand in the center of the piazza, it's still possible to buy fresh fruits and vegetables. Both locals and visitors enjoy stopping by one of... continue


Guide written by the community written by Andrew adams

Romeo, Romeo, where forth art thou Romeo? Probably third in line behind the American and French guys getting their picture taken rubbing the right breast of Juliet's statue. It is suppose to bring you luck. The legendary lovers famed balcony has become a must see stop for tourists visiting Verona. It doesn't matter if they were fictional characters and the balcony was built in the 1930's to provide photo seeking... continue


Guide written by the community written by Cedric Mills

The Arena Di Verona, built in the first century AD, is one of the best conserved Roman amphitheaters. Surprisingly, it's not just an old crumbing building. It is still used today for Opera performances and modern music concerts. Opera season is between June and September. Walking through the ancient corridors you are overwhelmed by the sheer size of the structure. With 44 levels, the arena has a current capacity of... continue


Guide written by the community written by Bridget Brackett

The last time I visited Verona I have been in fact totally enraptured by the beauty of the landscapes, some near the lake, some next to the mountains and other near the city: the hills of Verona are on different areas of the beautiful Veneto province. If you rent a car or a motorcycle from Verona it takes you only a few minutes to reach the green hills just outside the town and dedicate yourself to a beautiful... continue


Guide written by the community written by Bridget Brackett

Strolling through the historical center of Verona is a really unique experience: there are not so many cities with a such small historical zone combining so many and great cultural attractions.Verona is also famous for being the city of Romeo and Juliet and during my visit i entered the famous house where in the garden is the famous balcony and the statue of Juliet, which many tourists touch hoping that it... continue


Guide written by the community written by Cedric Mills

The roundup of tips for Valentine's Day can not be separated from the city of Romeo and Juliet: thus, for the third consecutive year, the home of Shakespeare's lovers are preparing to welcome pairs of visitors from around the world to Verona in Love.The events will start  Tuesday, 9th February with the inauguration of Verona in Love 2010 and the opening of several thematic exhibitions ( the argument is, of... continue


What to see for an holiday in Verona top
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